Accidents & Preventing Injuries

Burns_WHO_P_Virot_HRRoad traffic crashes, drowning, burns, falls and poisoning hurt, disable or kill millions of children across the world every day.

Older children can learn to keep themselves safe and share what they learn with their families and friends, to stop more children getting hurt by accident.

Scroll down to read our Top Ten messages on Accidents and Preventing Injuries for children to learn and share, plus ideas on what children can do to understand, find out more, take action and reflect on this topic.

Download our PDF for your copy of all the messages and how to get children started with learning and sharing.

  • MESSAGE ONE

    Road traffic crashes, drowning, burns, falls and poisoning hurt, disable or kill millions of children across the world every day.

    Older children can learn to keep themselves safe and share what they learn with their families and friends, to stop more children getting hurt by accident.

    Scroll down to read our Top Ten messages on Accidents and Injury for children to learn and share, plus ideas on what children can do to understand, find out more, take action and reflect on this topic.

    Download our PDF for your copy of all the messages and how to get children started with learning and sharing.

    Find out more:

    • Keep children away from cooking stoves and fires.
    • Never leave pots with hot liquids…
      • where small children can reach them
      • on surfaces small children use to pull themselves up
      • where they can be knocked over.
    • Cool burns and scalds with cold water and keep them clean.

    Take action:
    Play the ‘But why game’ about accidents at home.

    Find out where there are risks of burns at home.

    Think of ways to make our homes safer and share ideas with posters, songs and plays.

  • MESSAGE TWO

    Children need to keep away from breathing smoke from fires. It causes illness and coughing.

    Smoke from fires makes the air we breathe dirty. Tiny particles of ash from the fire (called soot) float in the air and we breathe them in. This can make it harder for our lungs to fight off infections. Children who breathe in this kind of dirty air are twice as likely to get pneumonia which is a dangerous illness that can kill us.

    Find out more:

    • Stop small children getting close to cooking fires.
    • About dangers where food is cooking.

    Take action:

    Learn about cooking stoves that are clean and don’t give off smoke.

  • MESSAGE THREE

    Anything poisonous must be kept out of the reach of children. Don’t put poisons in empty soft drink bottles.

    Medicines, household cleaners, solvents, fuels, pesticides… our homes have all kinds of poisons in them. Poisons need to be clearly labelled. They need to be stored out of reach of children – on a high shelf or locked up in a cupboard.

    NEVER put chemicals in drinks containers or other food cartons – someone who doesn’t know what it is might drink it.

    Find out more:

    • Learn basic first aid so we know what to do if someone has swallowed a poison.
    • Make posters about keeping poisons safely: how to store them, label them and keep them away from children.

    Take action:

    • Find out what poisons are used at school or at home.
    • What are they used for? Make a list.

  • MESSAGE FOUR

    If a child is burnt, put cold water on the burn immediately until the pain lessens (10 minutes or more).

    Children can get burnt easily where there are hot stoves, hot pans and hot drinks. If child gets burnt or scalded with hot liquid act quickly to reduce the pain and help the burn to heal – cool the burn with clean, cold water. Do not put anything else on the burn: butter, ointments or lotions can make the burn worse not better. If the burn is large – bigger than the size of the child’s hand – then get help from a health worker right away. Keep the burn lightly covered with a wet, clean cloth but do not put anything else on the burn.

    Find out more:

    • Pay ‘Spot the accident’ and see if we can find all the risks of accidents.
    • See the poster on first aid for burns and learn how to avoid getting burnt.
    • Make a first aid kit that we can use if gets injured.

    Take action:

    How we can keep safe from hot things and hot liquids in the kitchen.

    What to do if someone is burnt.

  • MESSAGE FIVE

    Vehicles and bicycles kill and injure children every day. Be aware of all vehicles and show others how to be safe too.

    Every day, children are killed on roads across the world. Road traffic accidents are often serious because children are so small and vehicles are so much bigger, heavier and faster. Children are most often hurt when they are crossing roads but they are also hurt when they are passengers in cars, on motorbikes and on motorbike taxis. Roads everywhere in the world are getting busier and road traffic is getting faster in all of our towns and villages. We can all learn how to stay safe on the roads by looking and listening for vehicles while we cross.

    Find out more:

    • By making a road in the classroom or playground and practise crossing it safely.
    • Learn more about what children can do to make roads safe.
    • Start a campaign to raise awareness of children’s safety on roads.

    Take action:

    Find out the rules for road safety or discover our own rules.

    Learn the rules and teach others too.

    Make a map of our journeys to school and mark where the safe and dangerous places to cross roads are.

  • MESSAGE SIX

    Look out for dangers for young children like knives, glass, electric plugs, wire, nails, pins etc.

    All children are curious and small children love to put things in their mouths. Very small things – like buttons, coins, small batteries, paper clips – should be kept away from small children. Small children have little fingers that can find switches, wires and electrical sockets, check the environment small children are playing in and remove anything they could hurt themselves with.

    Find out more:

    • Role play being safety aware when we are looking after a child.
    • Make toys that are safe for young children to play with.
    • Learn basic first aid so we can help in an emergency.

    Take action:

    Find any dangers for young children in our homes.
    Share what we know about risks of injury to small children with adults.
    Watch out for small objects near children and put them out of reach.

  • MESSAGE SEVEN

    Stop young children eating dirt or putting small things into or near their mouths (e.g. coins, buttons) as these can block breathing.

    Crawling babies and young children who have just started to walk must be kept in a clean, safe place away from wires, plugs and small or sharp objects that could hurt them. Put small children on a mat where you can see them, checking and removing any small objects from the floor around them.

    Find out more:

    • What ways do people keep babies and young children away from hazards?
    • Why are babies and young children at higher risk from choking than older children or adults?

    Take action:

    Learn what to do when a baby is choking and show our parents, grandparents and brothers and sisters.

  • MESSAGE EIGHT

    Stop young children playing near to water where they may fall in (rivers, lakes, ponds, wells).

    Drowning is one of the major causes of death in children across the world. Even shallow water can be deadly to small children. Floods and fast running rivers, wells and waterholes as well as ponds, lakes and coastal waters are dangerous. So too are buckets and bowls of water used to bathe small children in.

    Find out more:

    • Do a survey to find out where in our community there is water that may put children at risk of drowning and what can be done to keep children safe.
    • Make a rope and float for the river or lake that can be used in an emergency.

    Take action:

    Learn how to stay safe in water.

    Learn how to help someone who is in trouble in the water without putting ourselves at risk.

    Remember to test the depth of water before we swim.

    Always swim with other people and never alone.

  • MESSAGE NINE

    Create a first aid kit for home or school (soap, scissors, disinfectant, antiseptic cream, cotton wool, thermometer, bandages/plasters & ORS).

    A health worker can help you make a first aid kit for home and for school. Children can learn how to use each item in the first aid kit so they have the confidence to act when someone is injured and needs help.

    Find out more:

    • Test our knowledge on what goes into a first aid kit.
    • Do role plays to practise basic first aid skills.
    • Make a first aid station for our school.

    Take action:

    Listen to a health worker explain first aid and what we need in our first aid kit.

    Learn first aid skills and share them with our family.

    Understand why we need a first aid kit and make one for our home.

    Tell our friends and family to learn first aid too!

  • MESSAGE TEN

    When you go somewhere new with a young child, be aware! Look and ask about the dangers for young children.

    Keeping ourselves and younger brothers and sisters safe is all about being aware. We can learn to spot risks ourselves and ask others if there are any dangers we must be sure to keep small children away from. We can learn to be aware and alert to danger and prevent accidents before they happen.

    Find out more:

    • Create a safety campaign to raise everyone’s awareness of children’s safety.
    • Watch videos of children who have taken action against injury and accidents.
    • Play the ‘But why?’ game to learn more about why accidents and injuries happen.

    Take action:

    Learn to spot common hazards where there is a risk of burns, falls, drowning or busy roads
    with traffic.

    Help our family become aware of the risk of accident and injury so they can keep themselves
    and others safe.

 

Children can
learn, collect & share these messages!

Accidents

CHILDREN SAY THAT
WE CAN…

MAKE our own Accident & Injury Prevention Messages using our own words in our own language!

LEARN these messages so we never forget them!

ADD these messages to our collection!

SHARE these messages with other children and our families!

 

WHAT CAN CHILDREN
MAKE?

MAKE posters about keeping poisons safely: how to store them, label them and keep them away from children.

MAKE a first aid kit that we can use if gets injured.

MAKE toys that are safe for young children to play with.

MAKE a rope and float for the river or lake that can be used in an emergency.

MAKE a first aid station for our school.

CREATE a safety campaign to raise everyone’s awareness of children’s safety.

MAKE a survey to find out where in our community there is water that may put children at risk of drowning and what can be done to keep children safe.

WHAT CAN CHILDREN
DO?

PLAY the ‘But why game’ about accidents at home.

THINK of ways to make our homes safer and share ideas with posters, songs and plays.

PLAY ‘Spot the accident’ and see if we can find all the risks of accidents.

START a campaign to raise awareness of children’s safety on roads.

ROLE play being safety aware when we are looking after a child.

LEARN basic first aid so we can help in an emergency.

FIND any dangers for young children in our homes.

SHARE what we know about risks of injury to small children with adults.

LEARN what to do when a baby is choking and show our parents, grandparents and brothers and sisters.

LEARN to spot common hazards where there is a risk of burns, falls, drowning or busy roads with traffic.

DO role playing to practise basic first aid skills.

LEARN first aid skills and share them with our family – then tell our friends and family to learn first aid too!

 

WHAT CAN CHILDREN
ASK?

WHAT are the risks of burns at home?

WHAT should we do if someone is burnt?

HOW we can keep safe people from hot things and hot liquids in the kitchen?

WHAT ways do people keep babies and young children away from hazards?

WHY are babies and young children at higher risk from choking than older children or adults?

ASK a health worker to explain first aid and what we need in our first aid kit.

WHY do we need a first aid kit and how do we make one for our home?

HOW do we help someone who is in trouble in the water without putting ourselves at risk?

ALL 10 MESSAGES…

ACCIDENT & INJURY PREVENTION

  1. Cooking areas are dangerous for young children. Keep them away from fire and from sharp or heavy objects.
  2. Children need to keep away from breathing smoke from fires. It causes illness and coughing.
  3. Anything poisonous must be kept out of the reach of children. Don’t put poisons in empty soft drink bottles.
  4. If a child is burnt, put cold water on the burn immediately until the pain lessens (10 minutes or more).
  5. Vehicles and bicycles kill and injure children every day. Be aware of all vehicles and show others how to be safe too.
  6. Look out for dangers for young children like knives, glass, electric plugs, wire, nails, pins etc.
  7. Stop young children eating dirt or putting small things into or near their mouths (e.g. coins, buttons) as these can block breathing.
  8. Stop young children playing near to water where they may fall in (rivers, lakes, ponds, wells).
  9. Create a first aid kit for home or school (soap, scissors, disinfectant, antiseptic cream, cotton wool, thermometer, bandages/plasters & ORS).
  10. When you go somewhere new with a young child, be aware! Look and ask about the dangers for young children.

dsc_0300d